Humankind – The Latest Features Trailer Delves Into The Late Game Content

STADIA News Game News PC / Steam / Epic Store News

A new features trailer has dropped for the historical strategy game, Humankind. In this latest trailer the team focus on the end game content

According to the latest trailer, the Humankind end game will open up both the industrial and contemporary eras which will unlock new challenges to overcome. This will involve the invention of steam power and railroads


Trains and planes are not the only noteworthy inventions in the late game. Many technologies in the Industrial and especially the Contemporary Era offer empire-wide bonuses that allow you to capitalize on a strong scientific foundation even if your industrial base, population, or military may not be as strong. Several of the most advanced technologies at the end of the technology tree offer particularly powerful bonuses and will grant you a large amount of fame as well. 

On the other hand, if you feel that your industrial power is greater than your research capabilities, you can invest in the National Projects like Planetary Observation Satellite Launches or your Lunar Landing Project. Much like Cultural Wonders, National Projects are Shared Projects that several cities can collaborate on, but they are even grander in scope: They require more space to be reserved for them and are completed across multiple stages. Each of these stages will grant you fame, as well as permanent economic benefits. 

Be careful when expanding your industrial base, though: Certain Districts and Infrastructures will generate Pollution. While your people can deal with a small amount of pollution, high levels of pollution will be a problem. Locally, territories with moderate to high pollution will suffer high to severe penalties to stability and most resource yields of their tiles. High amounts of global atmospheric pollution will apply moderate penalties to all players everywhere, and in the worst cases can lead to the game and your story of humankind ending early. 

Of course, not every player enjoys focusing primarily on their economy, and those of you who prefer a more aggressive approach to dealing with your neighbors will find that warfare changes in the late game as well. 

These changes begin with the advent of gunpowder warfare in the Early Modern Era. Arquebusiers and Musketeers no longer suffer penalties against melee attackers like their counterparts of the earlier eras, but are less mobile than them, unable to both move and fire in the same turn. This limit to their mobility disappears with Line Infantry in the Industrial era, but at that point your soldiers have learned to entrench themselves for a huge defensive bonus against ranged attacks, so you may be better off standing still anyway. 

Some powerful heavy weapons will be able to shatter not only the fortifications of enemy cities, but also the field defenses of enemy soldiers, depriving them of their defense bonus for being Dug In. If you would rather pin your opponent down, you can hit them with volleys of Machine Gun fire, which will reduce their combat strength and forbid movement, but be ready for your enemy to field Armored Vehicles to ignore this suppression effect. 

Once you bring the really big guns, though, the battlefields become too small. Artillery and warships of the late Industrial Era and beyond are so powerful and have such long range that it can fire into battles from outside the battlefield, hitting multiple tiles at a time. Even if there is no battle to support, these cannons can wear down your enemies by shelling their armies or districts to damage everything in a small area. 

SOURCE / READ MORE: Steam


Humankind will be releasing this August 17th for the PC and Stadia

You can watch the new trailer below..

  • GAME: Humankind
  • DEVELOPER: AMPLITUDE Studios
  • PUBLISHER: SEGA
  • RELEASE DATE: August 17th, 2021
  • PLATFORM: PC and Stadia
  • GENRE: Historical, Strategy
  • SOURCE: Steam
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  • SEE ALSO:
  • Humankind – General News

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